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to weigh in on it. >> eric: hang on to the ambassador rice comment commenta minute. bob, you were fist-pumping while hearing henry say there is a meeting and they may kick part of it down the road. >> eric: what is happening here -- north dakota is getting to point you can't write legislation, not enough time to write legislation revamping social security and medicare. they can pass the tax cuts. leave the top 2%, $250,000 their taxes will go up. they have to have language there to deal with the republican concern about entitlement. i think it will be along the lines of sequestration. if you don't have an agreement on social security, medicare or medicaid, social security or medicare at a certain point, date certain there will be automatic cuts in programs. >> andrea: they will take away the defense cuts and push -- >> dana: they will push off the defense cuts. push them off. >> andrea: how howardly is that? i think a lot of members secretly wanted the cuts to take place so they don't take a stand and they don't have to vote either for higher taxes or on entitlements. today is -- bob i
that the economies matter. i think whether it's been leon panetta, bob gates, admiral mullen, the constant focus on economic feminism, i don't know canada's net position with china, but it does raise this fundamental question of whether american debt is an asset or a liability. you know, the conference in dallas yesterday were recently, where someone made a comment that an american source of power to every different in the past that it defies the pentagon and the size american debt that we're too big to fail. deadhorse lake bigger problem than us. i be interested when you're anything about policy do you look at that as a source of leverage or does it strain american options tremendous a? >> steve, very simply, the u.s. situation with respect to our deficit and debt is a national security liability. we need our senior leadership. we need a senior leadership to take it on. we have an opportunity to do so. we have a requirement to do so. at the foundation of national power is ultimately economic comment and in terms of global influence, in terms of the ability to support a military, the economic is
-in allowance. hurry. bonus cash ends january 2nd. a regular guy with an irregular heartbeat. the usual, bob? not today. [ male announcer ] bob has afib: atrial fibrillation not caused by a heart valve problem, a condition that puts him at greater risk for a stroke. [ gps ] turn left. i don't think so. [ male announcer ] for years, bob took warfarin, and made a monthly trip to the clinic to get his blood tested. but not anymore. bob's doctor recommended a different option: once-a-day xarelto®. xarelto® is the first and only once-a-day prescription blood thinner for patients with afib not caused by a heart valve problem, that doesn't require routine blood monitoring. like warfarin, xarelto® is proven effective to reduce the risk of an afib-related stroke. there is limited data on how these drugs compare when warfarin is well managed. no routine blood monitoring means bob can spend his extra time however he likes. new zealand! xarelto® is just one pill a day, taken with the evening meal. and with no dietary restrictions, bob can eat the healthy foods he likes. do not stop taking xarelto®
that. he's considered -- he was brought in to citigroup by, i believe, bob rubin, spent time in the clinton administration. people describe him as a pretty partisan guy. he's much more liberal than geithner, although geithner is a guy whether he's liberal or not personally carried the president's water pretty well. you know, i'm not saying he did a good job, i'm just saying he did not deviate from the president's line. you know, it's interesting. guys like bob rubin when they were treasury secretary, he basically went up against the president. if you read some of bob woodward's books, which i have, i mean, the way bob woodward tells it, bob rubin, the treasury secretary for clinton, forced clinton to raise taxes but used that money for deficit reduction because he believed that would control the economy. president clinton did listen to him. and i'll tell you, i talked to bob rubin about that anecdote where clinton says you tell me a bunch of bond traders control the economy -- i'm paraphrasing -- and rubin said, yes, i am. i asked him about that once a couple years ago, and h
. republican senator bob corker of tennessee and democratic senator claire mccaskill of missouri. >>> finally, our special economic roundtable. as both sides battle over the nation's fiscal health, what can we expect from the economy in a second obama term? what is the vision for an economic rebound? >>> from nbc news in washington, the world's longest-running television program, this is "meet the press" with david gregory. >>> and good sunday morning. amidst a lot of partisan rhetoric on both sides, talks on the fiscal cliff are now at a stand still, and the president is back on the campaign trail of sorts. this time to try to win in a court of public opinion for his plan to avert an automatic tax hike for everyone on january 1. that's where we'll start this morning with the point man on the negotiations for all of this. the secretary of treasury, tim geithner. and our roundtable is also here. standing by for reaction, including the man behind the republican pledge not to raise taxes at all, not to raise tax rates, grover norquist. here's here. we'll get reaction from him as well in our roun
announcer ] this is bob, a regular guy with an irregular heartbeat. the usual, bob? not today. [ male announcer ] bob has afib: atrial fibrillation not caused by a heart valve problem, a condition that puts him at greater risk for a stroke. [ gps ] turn left. i don't think so. [ male announcer ] for years, bob took warfarin, and made a monthly trip to the clinic to get his blood tested. but not anymore. bob's doctor recommended a different option: once-a-day xarelto®. xarelto® is the first and only once-a-day prescription blood thinner for patients with afib not caused by a heart valve problem, that doesn't require routine blood monitoring. like warfarin, xarelto® is proven effective to reduce the risk of an afib-related stroke. there is limited data on how these drugs compare when warfarin is well managed. no routine blood monitoring means bob can spend his extra time however he likes. new zealand! xarelto® is just one pill a day, taken with the evening meal. and with no dietary restrictions, bob can eat the healthy foods he likes. do not stop taking xarelto® rivaroxaban without
the fiscal cliff. this included chris van hollen. also, senators mark warner and bob corker, a republican from tennessee. this is one hour. >> good morning. i'm the head of bloomberg government. thank you for joining us today, and thank you to deloitte for partnering with us in this event. when we launched bloomberg government just about two years ago, we had the aspiration of creating a one-stop shop, with data, tools, news, and analysis to help government affairs and government sales professionals make better and faster decisions. we went a long way toward achieving that aspiration. a big part of it is conversations on the important issues that face our nation today, particularly at the intersection of business and government. today's discussion on the fiscal cliff clearly meets that. we are honored to have such a thoughtful panel. senator mark warner, senator bob corker, congressman chris van hollen, governor tim pawlenty, who is currently president and ceo of the financial services roundtable. moderating our discussion today is al hunt. we always love having al over here. he really pu
heartbeat. the usual, bob? not today. [ male announcer ] bob has afib: atrial fibrillation not caused by a heart valve problem, a condition that puts him at greater risk for a stroke. [ gps ] turn left. i don't think so. [ male announcer ] for years, bob took warfarin, and made a monthly trip to the clinic to get his blood tested. but not anymore. bob's doctor recommended a different option: once-a-day xarelto®. xarelto® is the first and only once-a-day prescription blood thinner for patients with afib not caused by a heart valve problem, that doesn't require routine blood monitoring. like warfarin, xarelto® is proven effective to reduce the risk of an afib-related stroke. there is limited data on how these drugs compare when warfarin is well managed. no routine blood monitoring means bob can spend his extra time however he likes. new zealand! xarelto® is just one pill a day, taken with the evening meal. and with no dietary restrictions, bob can eat the healthy foods he likes. do not stop taking xarelto® rivaroxaban without talking to the doctor who prescribes it for you. stoppin
. >> it is me. >> number three, bob costas. did he cross the line? number five, the most outrageous royal prank ever. >> hello there. could i please speak to kate please, my granddaughter? >> this is piers morgan tonight. good evening. our big story tonight from what every one is talking about. washington's high-stakes game of "let's make a deal," to the royal prank called heard around the world. to bob costas talking about guns. and this shocking new york subway photograph. reports of chemical weapons in syria. let's get started with what promises to be a lively discussion. abbe huntsman, and a host of huff posts live. and welcome to you all. let's start with guns and the fallout of the murder and suicide of jovan bellcher and his girlfriend. bob costas of nbc spoke out about this. let's watch what he said tonight. >> i believe that there should be more comprehensive and effective controls on the sale of guns. roughly 40% of the guns purchased in this country do not require a background check for purchasing. i don't see any reason why someone should be able to purchase military style or body a
recuperating from his wounds at an army hospital in michigan. future majority leader bob dole, another young gi, who had been also wounded in the european theater, and he told senator inouye he wanted to go to law school and go to congress. bob dole was elected to congress one year after senator inouye. senator inouye always joked, "i went with the dole plan, and i beat him. " he has been a soft and powerful voice. although he was an unabashed progressive democrat, he always put his country first and his party second. dan was a vital presence in the senate, and in death, he will remain a legend. his last words on earth, "aloha," and it is with a heavy heart that we did him aloha, we love you, to a legend of the senate, daniel inouye. -- we bid him aloha. >> good morning. on behalf of the united states house of representatives, i extend condolences to his family, colleagues, and constituents. in late 1963, a young freshman senator stood under the splenda dome, as we do now, in vigil and in prayer. years on, daniel inouye could still remember how quiet this ever boisterous rotunda became when pre
commanded our respect in a remarkable way. part of it was because of his service in the war. he and bob dole, our former colleague, literally were wounded at about the same time in europe and were in the same hospital recovering from tremendously serious wounds. senator inouye, of course, later was awarded the congressional medal of honor for that. senator pryor was telling the story that when senator inouye was finally elected to congress he wrote senator dole a note and said, "i'm here. where are you?" because both of them, when they were recovering from their war wounds, had determined that one day they wanted to serve in the united states congress. inouye got here first. a few years ago senator inouye and senator ted stevens invited a number of us to go with them to china. it was quite an experience. senator stevens -- of course, another world war ii veteran -- had flown the first cargo play plane into what was then peking in 1974. and senator inouye was well-regarded in china for that service. and so the group of norse -- there must have been -- and so the group of norse -- ther of se m
's nothing. >> can you imagine a bob dole or george mitchell not getting that done? >> no. >> and the president did go to $400,000 on the tax level. i think it's clear he probably would go to $500,000, too. >> sure. >> the really important thing he did, he went along with the republican demands of entitlements on acola. that's a big deal. and means testing, affluent seniors for medicare. that's not as far as some are willing to go. >> it is, though. there is no doubt the president doing that, the white house is getting killed. >> by the left wing. >> by the left on -- and i think that really is the measure. they're getting killed. >> on acola. >> andrea, i creditized the white house a month or two ago about the president always talking about being courageous, but he was always courageous on the health care bill, on the stimulus, all these things that republicans weren't going to support anyway. but here it's significant. here talking about the cost of living adjustments. that's a lot of money over time. i thought boehner going to $1 million was significant as well. they've
's the chief of staff to governor bob macdonald. to denise northrop came from state of oklahoma where she is chief of staff to governor mary phalen and roxanne white is joining us from the great state of colorado where she's chief of staff to governor john hicken looper. and so their full bios are on the pamphlets and nare all very accomplished professionals in their careers. i'm going to ask roxanne to start and we can come down this way. >> great. first, thank you for the report. i think it provides a good framework for all of us as states to continue to look at the challenges facing us. we have been engaged in pension reform in colorado. our pension fund is about 69% solvent. we did major reform in the last administration. and we are now in court trying to defend that reform. our pension costs by 2020 will go to 22%. and so to give you a sense of how far behind we were as a state, if we lose in court and the battle is whether or not we as a state have a right to ratchet down the colas for our state employees, then we could see a need to go to 25% of compensation by 2020. so it's fairly
from republican senator bob corker. tonight, we get a different perspective on the question of so-called entitlements. many lawmakers and economists have argued it's essential to make big changes to medicare and social security. among those ideas are raising the eligibility age; means- testing for wealthy recipients; cuts in spending and benefits and a bigger role for private competition in health care. max richtman has been arguing against making many of these changes as part of this fight. he's the president of an advocacy group, the national committee to preserve social security and medicare. he joins us now. >> welcome. >> thank you for inviting me. >> first of all, why shouldn't social security and medicare be part of the entire group of government spending programs that are being looked at to get to deal with the deficits? >> well, before i answer that i was very interested in the way you characterized these programs as entitlements. so-called, you said, entitlements. and we think that a better term would be earned benefits. you know, i counted the letters in the word "entit
] let me ask you, would we have a holocaust with the fault -- really? i wonder. the aforementioned bob said this was in an interview with me a few years ago that in the academy there's a feeling of don't let's be too rude to stalin. he was a bad guy, yes, but the americans were bad guys too and so was the british empire. eric die the, and apologist for communism and stalin. bob, who told the truth about the soviet union won a degree from a university run by, a sadly corrupt president, i believe, who admired bob. that says something about academia and the world. did you see the poster the e.u.? showing all the symbols of europe? it showed a cross, star of david, crescent and so on, and a hammer and cycle. there was a bit -- there's an outcry from the lit wanians, and why aren't we in the west sympathetic enough to the sufferers, the persecutors under communism to subject ourselves? why leave it to these? but there it was. i'm fairly relaxed about the communism symbols. you see a guy with a cccp sweatshirt and his trinkets. i did a study of this, a simple magazine piece, and, you know, t
, bob costas uses a horrifying murder-suicide involving a nfl player to call for stricter gun control. appropriate use of his platform? our news watch panel weighs in. ♪ i wish my patits could see what i see. ♪ that over time, having high cholesterol and any of thesrisk factors can put them at increased risk for plaque buildup in their arteries. so it's even more important to lower their cholesterol, and that's why, when diet and exercise alone aren't enough, i prescribe crestor. in a clinical trial versus lipitor, crestor got more high-risk patients' bad cholesterol to a goal of under 100. [ female announcer ] crestor is not right for everyone. like people with liver disease or women who are nursing, pregnant or may become pregnant. tell your doctor about other medicines you're taking. call your doctor rht away if you have muscle pain or weakness, feel unusually tired, have loss of appetite, upper belly pain, dark urine or yellowing of skin or eyes. these could be signs of rare but serious sideeffects. ♪ is your cholesterol at goal? alk to your doctor aut crestor. [ female anno
and bob dole, our former colleague, literally were wounded at about the same time in europe and were in the same hospital recovering from tremendously serious wounds. senator inouye of course was awarded the congressional medal of honor for that. senator pryor was telling a story that's when senator inouye was finally elected to congress he rode senator dole aide notes that said, i am here. where are you? because both of them when they were recovering from their war wounds had determined that one day they wanted to serve in the united states congress and inouye got here first. a few years ago, senator inouye and senator ted stevens invited a number of us to go with them to china. it was quite an experience. senator stevens, of course another world war ii veteran, had flown the first cargo plane into what was then the king in 1944 and of course senator inouye was well regarded in china for that service. so the group of senators, there must have been a dozen of us from both parties, got more time with mr. hu and mr. wu the one and two leaders of china than almost the present of the uni
republican senator bob corker if a deal is likely and tell you how no deal could significantly impact everything from the price of milk to the price of gas. >>> we also look back at the life and legacy of general norman schwarzkopf. and a double agent tells us how facebook was used to infiltrate al qaeda. >>> but we begin this morning with today's "eye opener," your world in 90 seconds. >>> the house and republican have left town. the negotiations between the president and speaker have fallen apart. you can't legislate with yourself. >>> republicans have bent over backward. we wanted an agreement, but we had no takers. >> washington scrambles to avert the fiscal cliff. >>> president obama has asked the congressional leaders to meet at the white house today. >> if they cannot reach a deal, the economists warn that could trigger another recession. >> are they going to avoid a fiscal cliff, eric? [ laughter ] as stormin' norman has died. he commanded the u.s.-led international coalition and forced saddam hussein's forces out of kuwait. >>> some of the same states are bracing for yet anot
is unaccountable, saturday night at 10:00 eastern on "after words" on c-span2. >>> pennsylvania senator bob casey on syria's civil war. he spoke along with incoming house foreign affairs committee chair ed royce on iran's nuclear program. the foundation for defense of democracies hosted this event. >> welcome. welcome again to the foundation for the defense of democracies annual washington forum. my name is mark argosh and i'm a proud supporter of fdd. it brings me great pleasure to introduce another senior official doing great work on capitol hill. congressman ed royce currently chairs the subcommittee on terrorism, nonproliferation and trade. last week he was selected to be the next chairman of the house foreign affairs committee. congratulations, congressman, on this new and important role. [applause] >> thanks, mark, thank you very much. >> it's no surprise that congressman royce has been entrusted by his colleagues with the committee's gavel have. he stands consistently at the forefront at the fight against global terrorist groups that threaten the united states including al qaeda. in his un
? i did. we did, bob. we did. got it. >>> good morning. it's 8:00 on the east coast. 5:00 a.m. on the west coast. time to wake up, everyone, as you take a live look at new york city. welcome back to "morning joe." back with us on set we have donny deutsch, mark mckinnon, and richard haass. >> let's start -- there's so much to talk about but, richard, let's start in egypt. absolutely fascinating. i think a lot of people across the world were so heartened by the democratic, we thought, perhaps uprising that was going on in egypt. certainly we all knew to overthrow a dictator of 30 years, even if he was an american ally, and now you have mohamed morsi behaving like, well, a dictator. and he's now got roughly 39, 40 political parties in egypt rising up against him. it is a mess. >> what you're seeing in places like egypt is the difference between democracy and majorityism. people like morsi win elections but winning elections is the easy part. the question is whether they can govern. the question is whether there's any tolerance for minorities, for multiple points of view. he di
snapped. now as the city mourns, sportscaster bob costas goes off on gun control. i'm brooke baldwin. the news is now. an entire town evacuated after a shocking discovery involving explosives. >>> plus, he's on the run. but john mcafee talks to cnn after martin savidge goes on this bizarre adventure to reach him. >>> and joining me live, the ceo of ford, on what he told president obama behind closed doors about the fiscal cliff. n 315 horsepower. what's that in reindeer power? [ laughing ] [ stops laughing ] [ male announcer ] chevy's giving more. this holiday season, trade up to get the 2012 chevy silverado all-star edition for 0% apr financing for 60 months plus $2,000 cash allowance or get a total value of $9,000. anne's tablet called my phone. anne's tablet was chatting with a tablet in sydney... a desktop in zurich... and a telepresence room in brazil. the secure cloud helped us get some numbers from my assistant's pc in new york. and before i reached the top, the board meeting became a congrats we sold the company party. wait til my wife's phone hears about this. [ cellphone vi
been making a speech moments ago and telling a where senator bob dole like senator inouye, they recuperated in michigan and later served in the senate together, bob dole walked up to the casket and lifted his left hand, his right hand was badly damage and saluted. a poignant moment. president obama at the washington cathedral, it was his really earliest political inspiration. both the president and senate majority leader reflecting on daniel inouye both a long time legislator but two days they will be getting back to work on the fiscal cliff. >> heather: the difficult job of reporting from hawaii, thank you so much, ed. >> gregg: the mother of john hammer telling her son is now in a louisiana hospital. he was released from a mexican prison last week after months behind bars. mexican authorities arrested him after he carried an antique shotgun into their country, even though he says he legally declared the weapon and had a permit for it. today his dad reportedly brought him to the emergency room during their drive back together to florida. his family reported he had a stoma
. >>> republican senator bob corker of tennessee has offered proposals in recent weeks to break the stalemate in congress. senator, good morning, good to see you. >> good morning, jeff good to be with you. >> are we going over the cliff? >> well it depends on what that means. i think 98% of the people in our country can be assured that at some point over the next short period of time, their income taxes are going to be the same but this congress as you know has been more prepared than any to deal with the big issues our nation faces and what you're seeing is a lack of courage to deal with the spending issues. unfortunately, you know today the average american doesn't realize that there's 40% of government services that they're not paying for. only one-third of medicare is paid for by those people who actually use it and because there's been this charade going on, where the left and right basically have conspired together to shield the american people from the true cost of government, we really don't have any constituency here to help reduce spending because we have not
, he was horrible in debates. >> no, you had to hold your breath all the time. >> and then bob dole, you had to hold your breath. and george w., good old guy, but that guy had trouble with the english language. >> you're going up against bubba. the best on the planet. >> it would be nice to have somebody -- >> no, that's why it was so sad when people like mitch daniels and haley didn't go in this time because they sound like churchill compared. >> guess who i just got an e-mail from? alexandra liebenthal. how exciting. julia, stay with us. >> jean just e-mailed me. >> you're a bad man. i mean, you really are. >> bad to the bone. >> we should do a segment. >> yeah. >> like the conversation we had at the dinner table. and you all have to listen. >> i have no idea what you're talking about. you wrote this past month. did you make your deadline? >> you know, again -- >> david. >> we love david. >> we love david. >> the magazine's awesome. it came with an ax. >> oh. >> i bought it for my mom for christmas. >> that was sweet. >> she'll use it. >> chop up. >> you have no idea. >> actionabl
up from there. and bob corker the senator from tennessee who was also on "meet the press" yesterday has proposed some legislation that instead cuts $641 million out of medicare. we'll see some scale up in that direction. there are some things that republicans could like in that initial bid. >> let me bring in congresswoman karen bass. so you're hearing all the sides going back and forth but the one thing that everybody seems to just about agree on is that we're not getting anywhere fast. lindsey graham says we're going over the cliff among others. what do you think? >> i don't believe we'll go over the cliff. i do think people are drawing a line in the sand which is a typical part of negotiation like your previous speakers said. i think that everybody understands the consequences, that the president has put forward a plan that would reduce taxes, or maintain the tax cuts for 98% of the u.s. public. and so i don't believe that my republican colleagues want to see taxes go up on 100% but they do need to come to table and counter the proposal. if they want changes and entitlements they
, he said. i met jim webb in my office not far from here. as a result of senator bob kerry asking me if i would spend some time with him, i was happy to do so, i'll never forget that meeting, just the three of us in the room. for those of us who have worked with bob kerrey, he was such -- he is and was such a vibrant person. it's almost mischievous, i guess is the way to put it. you could just tell how he had just a little touch of differentness. and when he brought him in to visit with me, i learned very quickly they were both warriors. bob kerrey, a navy seal, recipient of the medal of honor, and jim webb, as we've said, navy cross, two silver stars, two bronze stars. both veterans of the vietnam war. as we sat talking, it was obvious that they were both fighters, warriors, and jim certainly proved that in his 2006 campaign. the reason bob wanted me to visit with him is because jim webb had decided he wanted to run for senate. what did i think of it? well, i probably told jim what a lot of people told him -- you want to run for the senate? the election's right upon us. no, he said,
member the president said in a debate, the debate, he said that i didn't come up with this. then bob woodward came out and said, yes, you did. you know, both a top aide said that you guys came up with this idea of the white house. look in the mirror, right. >> that's exactly right. a lot of people on wall street and in the media are saying just don't do it, don't go over the cliff. you know, and then that shows a we that we still have a 16 trillion-dollar national debt. so when the world are we going to get serious about what the american people say they want, which is reduction in the debt so that we don't become a country that looks like greece. [talking over each other] gregg: capitol hill and pennsylvania avenue, maybe they just think 16 trillion, 25 trillion, who cares. maybe they don't think it has a depressive effect on economic growth, and soaking up the credit markets, which women's businesses. >> that's exactly right. we don't have to wonder what this will go by. all we have to do is look over the pond and see what's happening in countries like greece and italy and spain an
. >>> he is always outspoken on sports. bob costas touched a nerve within he spoke out on gun control earlier this month. find out what he's saying about that now, coming up. hing. and you really don't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it finds one, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all you need is a magic carriage. citi price rewind. start saving at citi.com/pricerewind. till you finish your vegetables. [ clock ticking ] [ male announcer ] there's a better way... v8 v-fusion. vegetable nutrition they need, fruit taste they love. could've had a v8. or...try kids boxes! trust duracell to power their donated toys? duralock power preserve. it locks in power for up to 10 years in storage. guaranteed. duracell with duralock. trusted everywhere. up high! ok. don't you have any usefull apps on that thing? who do you think i am, quicken loans? ♪ at quicken loans, our amazingly useful mortgage calculator app
to the event with remarks from incoming chairman ed royce and senator bob casey and talking about syria and tensions in iran coming up in a few minutes. we will bring you a portion of the morning portion of the discussion at the foundation for defense of democracy. this segment and this panel discussion focused on the egyptian elections. >> good morning everyone. thank you, bob, for that introduction and thank you all of you for coming out early this morning for what i think will be a lively debate. we are going to be asking the question if democracy is to triumph in the middle east, victories at the ballot box are inavoidable and essential. this is the motion we will be debating in the intelligence-squared format per requests from our panelists who have done this once already -- they have had a practice round. they have not had a chance of doing this, but i suspect, had probably had several scotches and talked about ways to defeat their foes. we know that this is a time of revolution in the middle east. it started with a fruit sell seller in tunisia and toppled a 230-year dictator that
. and republican senator bob corker. also on the program is the israeli a bastard to the united states. cnn's state of the union follows and welcomes the managing director of the international monetary fund, christine lagarde. at 4:00 p.m., here "face the nation"where they talked with alan simpson and erskine bowles. also on the program, an interview with cory booker. the sunday network tv shows are repairing here on c-span at noon -- here on cspan radio. listen to them all on cspan radio on 90.1 fm in the washington, d.c. area and nationwide on siriusxm radio. [video clip] >> the staff had to make the plan for the invasion of japan without considering the atomic bomb. it was estimated that to cocker the land would cost 700,000 man and 500,000 of them would be maimed for life. >> i choose to honor both the sacrifice of american servicemen fighting their way through the pacific and a little girl like sadako who died as a result of the atomic bomb. it is unimaginable with the most of them like to be close to that we're that far ball or originated and the blast was strongest. >> follow the journey th
're really talking about giving you right to work for less money. rick: joining us is bob cusack, managing editor of "the hill." is the president right? is this more to do with politics than in anything else? >> i'll tell you, rick, these union battles, they're rarely tepid. they are very intense. there will be obviously future battles. the unions, this is a big blow to them. look at wisconsin. you look now at michigan with this law going to pass. wisconsin with scott walker, collective bargaining battle unions lost. they got their guy to win the presidential election. but this is a blow to organized labor. i think these protests are just a message to other states. listen, if you try to do this, we're coming after you. rick: here's the quote though. does this have more to do with the role unions play in the workplace or more the role unions place in electing democratic politicians? >> the unions say, listen, this is a direct assault on them and it will lower wages and also lessen working conditions. industry leaders push back. partisan as you get. on energy issues, even immigration you hav
? who would have thought? i did. we did, bob. we did. got it. but with advair, i'm breathing better. so now i can be in the scene. advair is clinically proven to help significantly improve lung function. unlike most copd medications, advair contains both an anti-inflammatory and a long-acting bronchodilator working together to help improve your lung function all day. advair won't replace fast-acting inhalers for sudden symptoms and should not be used more than twice a day. people with copd taking advair may have a higher chance of pneumonia. advair may increase your risk of osteoporosis and some eye problems. tell your doctor if you have a heart condition or high blood pressure before taking advair. if you're still having difficulty breathing, ask your doctor if including advair could help improve your lung function. get your first full prescription free and save on refills at advaircopd.com. >>> we knew the gop brand was in shamblingb shamblingble, but now we have proof. a new nbc wall street journal poll shows the party favorability ratings is at 30%. close to a 10-year low. well, i'v
's disturbing that came out today and one of the senators mentioned this i think it was bob corker that people talk about well we need more money. john kerry brought this up. you can't cut the state department budget. senator corker from tennessee said look, we don't even know how the priorities are set at the state department because they are not telling us anything. nor do we know how far along they are in actually apprehending the people who did this and killed these people. our brave americans. we don't have anyone in custody apparently who we believe is at the center of all of this. i mean, someone in jail and morocco. is he still there? i mean, i don't think anyone knows anything. >> bill: there has been no information forth coming. you know, we asked secretary clinton to get involved with the marine case. the hammar case in mexico. and nobody can find her. i don't know. this is pretty spooky. and, remember, she will testify in january any say. she is out of there. her approval rating still hovers at 60%. 60% of the people still think she is doing a good job. >> her approval rating is hi
was and then in the second term was defeated. bob dole, john mccain, mitt romney. >> case closed. >> maybe that's not the right way, but -- boy that's the way the media has portrayed it. >> let me add a little color commentary there. let's go back to when you were a candidate for president. >> i knew you were going to bring that up, that painful memory of where that went. >> well we are sitting here because you had a platform that people connected with. you had a campaign with little resources. you fast-forward a few years to the candidate who had a similar message in this last election cycle, rick santorum. again, the same story. no resources, no backing from the establishment, but who almost captured the nomination. same case as you. it was that message that people were motivated by and engaged over. >> were there fewer evangelicals voting this time than four years ago? >> that was the challenge in this election. there was a lot more effort, and i can attest to it because i spent literally about two and a half months on the road working in the evangelical community and registering. we registe
have thought? i did. we did, bob. we did. got it. >>> paul o'neill may be best known as secretary of the treasury under president george w. bush, but it's a difficult call he made years before that that altered the course of a major american company and literally saved lives in the process. >> i can't say to you, you know, this is all one group or all another group. >> in 1987 o'neill became ceo of one of the largest and oldest aluminum companies in the world, alcoa. on the eve of its centennial, the storied corporation was in trouble. inefficient, rapid expansion had left profits dwindling and moral waning. putting o'neill in charge was a big change. in nearly 100 years, alcoa had never hired an out of house ceo. someone who had not climbed through the ranks of the tightly-knit management system and who was not well-versed in metal making. the company was in for a surprise with the first decision o'neill made. executives and shareholders thought it was bizarre, unorthodox, and indifferent to the bottom line. so what was that decision? let's find out. when you came to alcoa, descr
. senator bob corker is asking for specifics regarding the trillion in cuts that the president referred to on meet the press. and covering that from benghazi and on and on. >> and in your brew with david gregory you offered over one trillion and agreement with congress and avert the fiscal cliff. you are silent on the specifics. wrestling with the national's crisis help us to have a concrete plan and legislative language with you. >> it was interesting, very wide raging . there were not opportunities and he didn't get specifics when he talked about all of the things he's offered. at one point i offered so many changes and entitlements? i askscatched my head and wondered what changes and entitlements. he said the democrats arangry at me. i said what are the specifics. that was a interesting level. >> dave: he put in the corner and said only thing they care about is creating tax cuts for the wettley. demonize the opponent while you sate sit down. that works out it infuriate your opponent. the president's main goal is to raise taxings. put out legislation and put out a bill and vote on it
. before we go, you, bob have been known as the president's ear right for banking. >> i'm very close to him. liz: what is happening with the fiscal cliff, him and boehner. >> listen, they have had great meetings with ceo's. they have had three meetings with ceo's. the president wants a deal. boehner wants a deal. i think it has to be balanced with revenues including increased rates on taxes. i would say at like 75% that there's a deal. liz: well, there's a deal tomorrow when this auction is up. they're incredible. internship at chanel. come on you know a kid that wants that. incredible offers. good luck. good work you're doing, kerry. >> thank you for doing this. liz: kerry kennedy. oh the website, rfccenter.org. >> rfkcenter.org. liz: then you will click on it and see where the auction is. go falconning with rfk, jr., her brother. that's what you would like? david: i would like to go falconning. i would have to bid. liz: 5100. david: that is not bad. for a good cause. liz: always. david: apple and google have become french mys. -- frenemis. they are on a bid for kodak patents. we'll have t
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